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Acknowledgements

A special thanks to Sussex Wildlife TrustFriends of Rye Harbour Nature Reserve and Flag Ecology for their contribution to the funding of the new RX-wildlife website.

Website design and maintenance by Andy Phillips.

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3:18PM

FROM THE SEAWALL

The walk from Cliff End toilets to the end of Pett Pools is a very short one - about 2kms - but one during which you can see an amazing range of bird species ,more, I suspect than most other places in the county. This results from the great range of habitats along that seaside strip, ranging from sandstone cliffs through mature gardens, the coastal scrub of the PLPT land, freshwater of the canal & pools with their associated reedbeds, shingle, moorlog, rocky, sandy & muddy beach and the open bay.

It can be accessed at many points from the road and is pretty level. I usually reckon on taking one hour outwards and half back though confess that it may require more time if I stop & talk to someone. 

Yesterday was a misty spring-like morning with some migrants like Chiffchaff & Blackcaps already in place ans singing while others such as Yellow Wagtail, Swallows & Whimbrel  were arriving. In addition, little flocks of northbound Chaffinches, Linnets. Meadow Pipits & Siskins were moving NE along the seawall. 

Although most of the winter ducks have now left, a handful of Wigeon, Shoveler & Teal remain. A dozen or so Pochard might soon depart though there is a small local breeding population. 

Other interesting potential breeders were 5 pairs of Shelducks at the back of the marsh and a pair of Coal Tits at Toot Rock.

55 Turnstones fed on the poolside grass and about 25 Great Crested Grebes sat on the calm sea as Fulmars skimmed over the water.

With a few of the more reticent scrub-birds deigning to show themselves (Long-tailed Tit, Goldcrest & Bullfinch) along with the common species, the list came to 63. This is what I'd expect (though in miserable weather the previous week I'd only managed 46..... The record so far is 74, during September migration.

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