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Acknowledgements

A special thanks to Sussex Wildlife TrustFriends of Rye Harbour Nature Reserve and Flag Ecology for their contribution to the funding of the new RX-wildlife website.

Website design and maintenance by Andy Phillips.

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9:42PM

The Icklesham Hoopoe

Here is a photo of the Hoopoe present from Mon. 1st to Wed. 3rd in a private garden in Icklesham. I haven't heard of any sightings since it was last seen on Wednesday morning. Frantically feeding the whole time, it had the misfortune to arrive in last week's cold showery weather but hopefully regained enough strength to make it back across the Channel.

7:44AM

Beach Reserve 

Highlights this morning 51 Grey Plover, 57 Knot, 18 Bar-tailed Godwit, 11 Whimbrel and 11 Little Tern. Nice to see Black-headed Gull activity picking up again on Ternrey Pool after a shaky start to the season, although a paltry five Sandwich Terns present this morning is rather disappointing (early days yet? hmm possibly). Avocet pairs have remained the same as last year with 63, although the pair at Castle Water could (should) be added if they actually start doing something apart from attacking Greylag Geese. From Castle Water Hide yesterday, Little Ringed Plover, two Avocet, Peregrine, 50+ Sand Martin, 30+ Swift, 30+ Swallow and a few House Martins.

7:01AM

Clifftop Moths

A cold and windy night, with just two moths this morning-but two nice ones-a Brindled Beauty, and my first Great Prominent here. [pictured]

10:16AM

Waders and Warblers everywhere!

This is the time of year we love. A whole range of birds are now making Dungeness their home for the summer! We've had a huge increase in the amount of wading birds seen on the reserve over the last week as well as smaller birds such as whitethroat, nightingale, yellow wagtail and warblers such as sedge, reed and willow warblers

Whitethroat - Vera Carpenter

Although the lack of rain we have had over the past month has made some parts of the reserve suffer a bit, it's been great for views out of the visitor centre as islands are visible and lots of birds are using them. Yesterday, 13 different species of wader were counted on Burrowes pit alone! These included; oystercatchers, lapwing, whimbrel, little ringed plover, greenshank, dunlin, ringed plover, bar-tailed godwit, redshank, grey plover, turnstone, little stint and common sandpiper. 


Turnstone - Graham Parry

Over the weekend we also had 2 wrynecks spotted along the trail. Whitethroats, slavonian and black-necked grebes, pintail and garganey have also been seen. 2 male bitterns have also been heard booming which is promising!

Wryneck - Mike Langman

Slavonian grebe - Graham Parry

We've also had an influx of seabirds in at the reserve over the last couple of days. Iceland, common and little gulls are all here and pairing up. The terns are here! We've had black, little and over 50 common terns all appear on the reserve. Time to get the rafts out! 

Cuckoos are still about and can be heard frequently. A visitor on one of our bittern breakfast walks took a fantastic picture of a cuckoo as it obligingly sat in a bush eating the brown-tailed moth caterpillars which are its favourite delicacy. 

Cuckoo - by Vera Carpenter

Fancy experiencing the joys of the dawn chorus here at Dungeness? Then join us on a walk on Saturday 13th May at 6am to listen and learn what the birds are that you are listening to. Please call the reserve on 01797 320588 for more information and to book!

New to birdwatching? We have a beginners bird watching walk at 11am on Sunday 28th May. Come along and learn something new about the world of birds and our amazing nature reserve!

7:21AM

Clifftop Moths

Moth trapping has been on hold for the last few days due to unsuitable weather-usually too cold at night, but with strong-ish  wind and [welcome] rain thrown in . However I found five moths in and around the trap despite the cold this morning, including the first White Ermine of the year, and The Streamer, an  attractive  spring moth new to the house list.